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Full text of "The University of North Carolina record"



SEPTEMBER, 1903 



1HEUMMY 
tfTNt 



THE UNIVERSITY 



OF 



NORTH CAROLINA 




THE EECORD 



CNTEREO AT THE POST OFFICE AT CHAPEL HILL AS SECOND CLASS MATTER. 



SEPTEMBER, 1903 



NUMBER 23 



THE UNIVERSITY 

OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE KECORD 



CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

1903 



THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 
CHAPEL HILL 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA. 

Number 23. Fifty Cents a Year. September, 1903. 

THE WILLIAM PRESTON BYNUM, JR., GYMNASIUM. 

The announcement that Judge W. P. Bynum, of Charlotte, had given a 
gymnasium to the University as a memorial to his grandson, William 
Preston Bynum, Jr., has been received with great pleasure by friends and 
alumni. The gift was acknowledged on the part of the faculty by the 
following letter: 

"The Faculty of the University of North Carolina esteems it a privilege 
to express its appreciation of the memorial which Judge William Preston 
Bynum purposes to erect here to his grandson, William Preston Bynum, 
Jr., of the class of 1893. 

"This brilliant young man died at the close of his Sophomore year. But 
his brief residence at the University was amply sufficient to win for him 
the love and respect of his instructors and companions. 

"The College records bear witness that in scholarship he stood in the first 
rank; all who knew him remember the charm of his courteous bearing and 
hearty good-fellowship. He was in perfect sympathy with college life. 
It is fitting that the memory of so noble a character should live forever, as 
an inspiration to all who come into the University community. 

"The erection of a Gymnasium in memory of William Preston Bynum, 
Jr., commands our hearty sympathy and our grateful appreciation." 

Hon. R. H. Battle, Secretary of the Board of Trustees, also made 
acknowledgement on behalf of that body. 

This building, bringing health and strength to generations of students, 
will be a fitting monument to a noble young man, and will keep his mem- 
ory warm in the grateful hearts of thousands of the sons of the University 

A good gymnasium has been for a number of years one of the pressing 
needs of the University. No gift could have been more acceptable to the 
whole body of students. It is the wish of Judge Bynum that its erection 



4 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

be proceeded with immediately. Plans will be prepared and the contract 
let as soon as possible, so that it may be ready for use by the beginning of 
the session of 1904-05. 



OPENING OF THE FALL TERM. 

The session of 1903-04 opened with an enrollment larger than that for 
any fall term in the history of the University. Several of the departments 
have been strengthened by additional instructors and improved equipment, 
as noted elsewhere. There is reason to believe that this will be, in every 
way, the University's best year. 

The following statistical table shows the comparative growth for the 
past five years: 



ENTIRE YEAR. 


ACADEMIC. 


LAW. 


MEDICINE. 


PHARMACY. 


TOTAL.* 


1899-1900 


371 


80 


44 


20 


512 


1900-1901 


391 


64 


42 


32 


524 


1901-1902 


415 


61 


62 


29 


563 


1902-1903 


402 


93 


83 


46 


608 



At the end of September of this year, the registration was: 

384 78 69 51 582 

The total number for 1903-1904 will, therefore, probably be 640 or 650, as 
new students are constantly arriving now, and many come at the opening 
of the spring term in January. 

Comparing the numbers of academic students for the past five years, we 
have the following table: 

SENIORS. JUNIORS. SOPHOMORES. FRESHMEN. 

50 55 67 121 
52 50 91 107 

51 84 98 160 
64 59 98 156 

The numbers up to the end of September of this year were: 

21 59 74 93 137 

* Deducting those in more than one department. 



ENTIRE YEAR. 


GRADUATES 


1899-1900 


26 


1900-1901 


26 


1901-1902 


22 


1902-1903 


25 



THE UNlVEKsrn RECORD 5 

The average age of the freshman class for tke past five years: 

1899-1900 1900-1901 1901-1902 1902-1903 190:5-1904 

19yrs. 14dys. 18yrs. 20dys. 19yrs. 6mos. lHyrs.i) 1 .. mos. 19 yrB. %% mos. 

Ninety-two per cent, of the students are from North Carolina. South 
Carolina sends 16, New York 7, Pennsylvania 5, Virginia 5, Florida 4, 
Ohio 2, District of Columbia 2, Georgia 2, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 
Texas, Maryland, Louisiana and Kentucky, one each. That is, forty-nine 
students are from other states. 

Of the counties represented by more than fifteen men, Orange sends 30, 
Wake 25, Guilford 23, Mecklenburg 21, Wayne 18, New Hanover 17, and 
Forsyth 16. 

Sixty-four and one-half per cent, are communicants in some church. 
There are 162 Methodists, 110 Presbyterians, 116 Baptists, 102 Episcopalians, 
13 Christians, 9 Hebrews, 9 Lutherans, 7 Roman Catholics, 6 Moravians, 
4 Reformed, 4 Disciples, 2 Congregationalists, 1 Unitarian. 



THE UNIVERSITY AND THE GRADED SCHOOLS. 

The University of North Carolina, recognizing its obligations as head of 
the public school system of the State, aims to build up and foster an edu- 
cational spirit among its students, to prepare them for service and leader- 
ship in all movements in behalf of popular education, and to furnish the 
State with teachers specially prepared for effective work in the school 
room. The success of its efforts is seen in the great number of University 
men now teaching in public schools, private schools, and colleges. 

No branch of the public school service in North Carolina has 
grown more in numbers and popular favor during the past twenty years, 
or done more to prove the value and effectiveness of the public schools, 
than the constantly increasing number of graded schools in our cities and 
towns. In fact, the work of the city graded school is so well done that in 
many counties several smaller districts have been consolidated and the 
people, following the example of the people in the cities, have voted a 
special tax for the support of a rural modern graded school. Below is 



6 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

given a partial list of University men now engaged in the graded school 
work of the State. They have chosen teaching as their profession, and are 
rendering North Carolina the best of service. They daily come in contact 
with more than twenty thousand boys and girls, and the University re- 
joices in the great work that they are doing for the future citizenship of 
North Carolina. 

University Men in Graded School "Work in North Carolina. 



Albemarle, 


A. H. Jarratt, 


Superintendent. 


Ashboro, 


N. W. Walker, 


Superintendent. 


Asheville, 


A. C. Kerley, 


Principal. 


Charlotte, 


Alex. Graham, 


Superintendent . 


Concord, 


Walter Thompson, 


Superintendent. 




J. D. Lentz, 


Principal. 


Durham, 


W. D. Carmichael, 


Prin. High School, 




W. J. Brogden, 


Prin . Gram . School . 




W. G. Wharton, 


Teacher. 




R. 0. Everett, 


Teacher. 


Fayetteville, 


J. A. Jones, 


Superintendent . 


i 


J. R. Conley, 


Principal. 




B. F. Huske, 


Teacher. 




W. F. Stafford, 


Teacher 


Gastonia, 


J. S. Wray, 


Superintendent. 


Graham, 


C. R. Mclver, 


Superintendent. 


Granite Falls, 


S. T. Liles, 


Superintendent . 


Goldsboro, 


T. R. Foust, 


Superintendent. 




A. J. Bar wick, 


Principal. 


Greensboro, 


E. D. Broadhurst, 


Superintendent. 




W. H. Swift, 


Principal. 




B. S. Skinner, 


Principal. 


Hickory, 


D. K. MacRae, 


Superintendent. 


High Point, 


Geo. H. dwell, 


Superintendent . 




J. T. Smith, 


Principal. 


Ingold, 


J. A. Ferrell, 


Superintendent. 


Kinston, 


L. C. Brogden, 


Superintendent. 




W. Underhill, 


Principal. 



TIIK UNIVKKSITY KKCOKD 



LaGrange, 

Lenoir, 

Lexington, 

Max ton, 
Newborn, 
Oxford, 
Rockingham, 

Rocky Mount, 

Salisbury, 

Statesville, 

Smithfield, 

Tarboro, 

Washington, 

Wilkesboro, 

Wilmington, 

Wilson, 

Winston, 



R. H. Allen, 
E. A. Woltz, 
W. ^L Brown, 
J. E. Avent, 
H. P. Harding, 
R. G. Kittrell, 
A. B. Hill, 
L. J. Bell, 
L. L. Parker, 
S. J. Everett, 
A. T. Allen, 
R. A. Merritt, 
R. M. Davis, 
Harry Howell, 
W. J. Horney, 
R. D. W. Connor, 
E. P. Mangum, 
C. F. Tomlinson, 
W. S. Snipes, 
N. F. Farlowe, 
T. Hume, Jr., 



Superintendent. 

Superintendent. 

Superintendent. 

Superintendent. 

Superintendent. 

Superintendent. 

Superintendent. 

Principal. 

Principal. 

Principal. 

Principal. 

Superintendent. 

Superintendent . 

Superintendent. 

Superintendent. 

Principal. 

Superintendent . 

Superintendent . 

Principal. 

Principal. 

Teacher. 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT. 



The enlarged enrollment in the Law Department and the marked suc- 
cess of its classes in the recent examinations for law licenses by the Su- 
preme Court of the State are pleasing items to record for the University 
and its friends. 

The enrollment reached eighty-five last year, the largest in the history 
of the Institution; while this year's classes promise to pass that mark, and 
will probably number over one hundred. This enumeration does not in- 
clude a class of about forty students in Elementary Law, which is prepar- 
atory to business or to the extended law course later 



8 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Twenty-four men from this department stood for license at the last Feb- 
ruary term of the Court, and not a failure had to be recorded. Thirty-six 
men stood in the August examination, and thirty-five of them passed, the 
one man failing having been a University student for only two and a half 
months. This makes 59 out of a possible 60 of the University students, 
who have obtained licenses to practice law within the past year. 

The success of the applicants for license demonstrates the value of thor- 
ough training in the professional schools. Among those who went from this 
University to the examination in August were five men who had the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, two of whom received their degrees here, one at 
Georgetown, one at Cumberland, and one at the University of Michigan. 
Four others were Bachelors of Arts, one a Bachelor of Philosophy, and a 
majority of the others had the advantage of some years of college or uni- 
versity training. 

Of those who have obtained license after study in the University Law 
School during the last four years, many have entered upon practice in this 
State; others have gone to Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, South Car- 
olina, Oklahoma, Indian Territory, Texas, Washington, and Florida. 
Students from several other states, and one from Canada, are now attend- 
ing the Law School. The influence of the school is by no means confined 
to our own State. 

The Law Instructors believe that there are no harder or more honest and 
capable workers anywhere than are found in their average classes; and 
results would tend to justify their high opinion of their men. 



THE PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 

During the summer, four rooms on the basemei it floor of Alumni Hall 
were fitted up to accommodate the increase in the equipment of the Physi- 
cal Laboratory. 

Six typical Westinghouse and General Electric direct and alternating 
current generators and motors are being installed; also a rotary converter, 
a high potential testing transformer, a storage battery, with the various 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 9 

accessories, such as: a testing Bet, transformers, volt meters, ammeters 1 
watt meters, electro-dynamometers, a tachometer, etc. Orders for several 
desirable pieces of apparatus have been plaoed, some of whioh are being 
imported. Among the latter are a telescope, a spectroscope, an earth in- 
duotor and a tangent galvanometer. An electric furnace room is yet to be 
put in order for the two furnaces already received. A motor driven lathe 
and various tools and material add to the usefulness of the work shop. 
With its improved equipment, the Department of Physics is prepared to 
offer courses for which students have heretofore had to go to institutions 
in other states. 



OUR LANGUAGE. GRAMMAR. By C. Alphonso Smith, Professor 
of the English Language, University of North Carolina. B. F. 
Johnson Publishing Co. 

Here is a grammar that, even to the casual reader, is an interesting book. 
The typography is attractive, the subject matter is concerned with the 
vital things in the normal speech of men, and the treatment is fresh and 
unconventional. These last are virtues so unusual as to be almost unique. 
Grammars that for their infinite multiplicity of rules and exercises are out 
of all relation to speech, and grammars that under the name of language 
lessons are scarcely substantial enough for kindergarten use, exist in 
plenty; but grammars that are virile and at the same time of practical 
value are rare. This book answers the great need for a sane presentation 
of grammatical laws and principles in so far as these laws and principles 
are significaftit. 

The fact that the book is interesting and unconventional does not imply 
that it is not scholarly. Dr. Stnith is chiefly known, in his publications 
at least, for his scholarly work in philology. Scholarship is submerged in 
this book, but its presence is felt in the surenees of the*author's touch and 
the freedom of his treatment. More specifically, the effect is a convincing 
impression of mastery. 

Primarily, however, the book is a book to teach. Sound pedagogy is the 
source of its air of pleasing mastery. To the learning that comes from 



10 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

books the author has added the knowledge that comes from experience 
in teaching. The inductive method is followed wherever there is real 
difficulty in the idea to be conveyed. The examples that fully illustrate 
the text are new, and they are chosen with a judgment critically discrimi- 
nating. The exercises are always suggestive. The book is not padded 
with exercises, nor are deadening exercises put in for busy work. The 
exercises, especially, make clear the fact that the main intent of the book 
is constructive. The general plan of development is (1) explanations, (2) 
examples, (3) definitions, (4) exercises. From the student's standpoint 
the author has succeeded in being clear, comprehensive and interesting, 
and he has succeeded by justly sympathizing with the student's feelings 
and rights rather than by dogmatically assailing his ignorance. 



PUBLIC LECTURES FOR THE SESSION 1903-'04. 

Tentative Schedule. 

Those indicated by * constitute the recently inaugurated course of gen- 
eral lectures upon Hygiene. All lectures begin at 8 o'clock P.M., unless 
otherwise noted or advertised. 

Sept. 24. Dr K. P. Battle, ''Similarity in the Development of the Con- 
stitutions of Great Britain and of North Carolina." 

Sept. 25. Dr. C. S. Mangum, "Cleanliness; Internal and External."* 
(First period after Chapel exercises). 

Oct. 1. Dr. C. S. Mangum, "Physical Excesses."* (First period after 
Chapel exercises) . 

Oct. 8. Dr. H. V. Wilson, "Some Natural History Museums and Lab- 
oratories Abroad." 

Oct. 15. Mr. A. D. Browne, Gymnasium Instructor, "Physical Cul- 
ture."* 

Oct. 29. Col. F. J. Copeland, Star Course. 

Nov. 5. Dr. Thos. Ruffin, "The Common Sense of Law." 

Nov. 11. Mr. Chas. D. Kellogg, Naturalist, Star Course. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 11 

Nov. 13. Dr. Chas. Baskerville, "Flnoresoence, Phosphorescence, Ra- 
dium and Radio-active Phenomena." Illustrated. 

Nov. 19. Dr. Thos. Hume, "The Hymns of fche Ages." 
Jan. 15. Dr. C. L. Raper, "The Problem of Organized Labor." 
Jan. 21. Prof. J. W. Gore, "Lighting, Heating and Clothing."* 
Jan. 26. Hon. George R. Wendling, Star Course. 
Feb. 4. Prof. Collier Cobb, "Fossil Fields of Wyoming." 
Feb. 11. Mr. Mack, Associated Press, Star Course. 
Feb. 18. Dr. A. S. Wheeler, "Synthetic Chemistry." 
Feb. 25. Dr. F. Hopkinson Smith, "Mr. Carter of Carters ville, " Star 
Course . 
March 3. Dr. Isaac H. Manning, "Nutrition."* 
March 10. Dr. W. I. Royster, Subject to be announced. 
March 17. Dr. Archibald Henderson, Subject to be announced. 
March 24. Dr. Chas. Baskerville, "Air and Ventilation."* 
March 31. Dr. Chas. Baskerville, "Water, its Purification, and Sewage 
Disposal."* 
April 7. Dr. A. S. Wheeler, "Food and Food Adulterations."* 
April 14. Dr. R. H. Whitehead, "Causes of Infection."* 
April 21. Chicago Glee Club, Star Course. 
April 28. Dr. R. H. Whitehead, "Prevention of Infection."* 
May 5. Judge J. C. MacRae, "Sanitary Laws, or One's Duty to Neigh- 
bor and Self."* 



THE CLASS OF 1903. 



Of the fifty- seven men who received the bachelor's degree last June, 
eighteen are now engaged in teaching, some in colleges, some in acade- 
mies, but most of them in the public schools. Two of them are superin- 
tendents of graded schools, and one is county superintendent. 

Seven are studying medicine, and six law. Six are engaged in manu- 
facturing. Four are studying for the ministry, and one of the medical 
students is to be a medical missionary. Two or three of those now teach- 
ing intend to be ministers. 



12 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Six are in the banking business, four in general business, two in insur- 
ance. Two are pursuing non-professional graduate studies, one is em- 
ployed on a newspaper, one is in government service. 

It is not easy to estimate the value to the State of this number of trained 
young men. The University bids them God speed, and hopes that they 
may always be able to say, with Senator Vance: "The thing that has been 
of most benefit to me all my life is the fact that I was a student at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina.'" 



SCHEDULE OF FOOT BALL GAMES. 

The following is the schedule of foot ball games for this season: 

Sept. 26. Guilford College, at Chapel Hill. 

Oct, 3. Oak Ridge Institute, at Chapel Hill. 

Oct. 10. South Carolina College, at Columbia. 

Oct. 17. Virginia Military Institute, at Roanoke. 

Oct. 24. Georgetown University, at Norfolk. 

Oct. 31. University of Kentucky, at Greensboro. 

Nov. 7. Virginia Polytechnic Institute, at Norfolk. 

Nov. 14. Clemson College, at Chapel Hill. 

Nov. 26. University of Virginia, at Richmond. 



PROFESSOR GEORGE HOWE. 



The chair of Latin has always been an important one in the University. 
Since 1849, it has been filled by Professors Fordyce M. Hubbard, George 
T. Winston, Karl P. Harrington, and Henry F. Linscott. When Dr. Lins- 
cott died, at the close of the fall term last year, his place was filled temp- 
orarily, and the authorities made careful search for the best man who 
could be found for the professorship. From more than thirty candidates, 



T1IK I MYKKSITY EtBCOBD \'-S 

Dr. George Howe was selected at (he meeting of the Board in June. He 
is a native of (\>lumbia. South Carolina, coming From a family distinguish 
ed as physicians, Presbyterian clergymen, and in other professions. His 

bachelor's degree was taken at Princeton. For sonic years he taught with 
marked success in New York. After three years of study at the University 
of Halle, he received the degree of doctor of philosophy. Dr. Howe's pro- 
found scholarship, his ability as a teacher, and his charming qualities as 
a man make him a worthy successor of the good men who have filled, with 
honor and usefulness, the chair of Latin. 



PUBLISHED WORK OF THE FACULTY. 

Charles Baskerville. 

"The Rare Earth Crusade; What it Portends Scientifically and Tech- 
nically." Science (reprinted in Chemical News, London.) "Kunzite, 
a New Gem." Science (reprinted in the Scientific American, Sept. 5th, 
1903.) "Mercurous Sulphide." Journal American Chemical Society. 

"Rare Earth Mordants" (with T. B. Foust); "Injuries to Vegetation 
Produced by Gases escaping from Fertilizer Works, and Suits, Just and 
Unjust, resulting therefrom." Winter program of the New York Section 
of the Society of Chemistry. 

William Cain. 

"On the Algebraic Form %." Mitchell Scl. Soc. Journal. "Note on the 
Imaginary Roots of a Cubic." Mitchell Sci. Soc. Journal. 

Collier Cobb. 

Photographs and Drawings. Ware's Georgian Period of American 
Architecture. 

W. C. Coker. 

"The Woody Plants of Chapel Hill, N. C." Mitchell Sci. Soc. Journal, 
Vol. XIX, Part II. "On the Gametophytes and Embryo of Taxodium." 
Botanical Gazette, Vol. XXXVI, No's 1 and 2. "Algae and Fungi for Class 
Work." Journal of App. Microscopy, Vol. VI, No. 7. "A New Method 



14 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

of Sprouting Pollen Grains." Journal App. Micros, Vol. VI, No. 8. Selected 
Notes: No. I. Botan. Gaz. Vol. XXXV, No. 2. No. II. Botan. Gaz. Vol. 
XXXVI, No. 3. No. III. In hands of publishers. 

J. D. Bruner. 

Octave Feuillet's "Le Roman du Jeune Homme Pauvre." New edition 
of D. C. Heath. In hands of publisher. Victor Hugo's "Hernani," with 
literary introduction, notes and vocabulary. New edition of Am. Book 
Co. Ready for press. 
George Howe. 

Fasti Sacerdotum P. R. Publicorum Aetatis Imperatoriae. Pars I. In- 
augural Dissertation, Univ. of Halle, Germany. Published by B. G. Teub- 
ner, Leipzig. 

C. L. Raper. 

"Social Life in Colonial North Carolina." N. C. Booklet. "North Car- 
olina: A Study in English Colonial Government." 8vo, 260 pp. In press 
of the Macmillans, N. Y. and London. 

C. Alphonso Smith. 

"An English Grammar for the Common Schools," Published Sept 18th, 
1903, by B. F. Johnson Pub. Co., Richmond, Va. 

A. S. Wheeler. 

"Certain Derivatives of Trichlor-ethylidine-di-p-nitrophenamine" — 
(with M. R. Glenn), Mitchell Sci. Soc. Journal, vol. XIX, Part II. 

R. H. Whitehead. 

"The Histogenesis of the Adrenal." Amer. Journal Anatomy, July, 
1903. 



LECTURES AND ADDRESSES BY THE FACULTY. 

K. P. Battle. 

"Chapel Hill and its Advantages as the Site of the University." Un- 
iversity Summer School. "The Political Development of England and 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD L5 

North Carolina." Summer School of the Agricultural an <i Meohanica] 
College, Raleigh, N. C. 

W. S. Bernard. 

"The Library in College Work." The Teachers' Assembly, Wrights- 
ville, N. C, Juue 12th, 1903. 

J. D. Brunei*. 

"The Poetry of the Bible," Burlington, N C, in July. "The Wisdom 
Literature of the Bible," August 1903. 

Collier Cobb. 

Lecture before Summer School of the Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege of Raleigh. 

E. K. Graham. 

"A Note on the Elegies of Pope. " English Club, Columbia Univ., N. Y. 
Thomas Hume. 

"Shakspere's Moral Teaching." Univ. of N. C. Snmmer School, June 
20th. "Literature in the Common Schools." So. Ed. Ass'n, Asheville, 
N.C., July 1st. "Child-Study in the Sunday School." So. Ed. Ass'n, 
July 3rd. "Prophecy and History." Staunton, Va. Aug. 6th. "Religious 
Education." Staunton, Va., August 8th. "Heirs of the Ages." Waynes- 
boro, Va., August 10th. "The Religious History of the Valley of Va." 
Waynesboro, Va., August 30th. 

M. C. S. Noble. 

Lectured on the "Battle of Moore's Creek" at the Raleigh Summer School. 
Made addresses during July and August, on "Public Education," at Le- 
noir, Patterson, Hibriten Academy, Union Church, Blowing Rock, Shull's 
Mill, Boone, Mabel and Newton. 

C. L. Raper. 

Lectured in the Raleigh Summer School. Lectured in the University of 
N. C. Summer School. 

C. Alphonso Smith. 

Lectured from June 15th to July 10th, 1903, at University of N. C. Sum- 
mer School on Tennyson and Browning. Lectured from July 13th to 






16 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

July 31, 1903, on and the same subjects at the Summer School of the South, 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

Dr. K. P. Battle spent the summer working upon his "History of the 
University of North Carolina, ' ' the completion of which is looked forward 
to with great interest. 

Prof. H. V. Wilson has returned to the University after his year's 
leave of absence. Prof. Wilson's year was spent abroad, chiefly in Berlin, 
where he was occupied in preparing a report on a collection of deep-sea 
sponges made by the U. S. Fish Commission Steamer Albatross. For the 
prosecution of this research the Carnegie Institute made Prof. Wilson 
a grant of $1000.00 

The Committee on Historical Pharmacy has been established by the 
American Pharmaceutical Association to write the history of American 
pharmacy. Dr. Edward Kremers of the University of Wisconsin, who is 
National Chairman, has appointed Prof. E. V. Howell Chairman for North 
Carolina. 

Prof. Collier Cobb gave a course in Geology at the University Summer 
School. He spent the portion of the summer in a study of sands and sand 
movements along the North Carolina coast, and in work upon his text 
book of Geology. 

Dr. A. S. Wheeler taught six courses in Chemistry in the Summer 
School, five of which were laboratory courses. The laboratory was never 
before such a busy place during the summer season. During August, Dr. 
Wheeler devoted his time to library work on cellulose. 

Mr. C. A. Shore spent the months of June and July as botanical assist- 
ant in the expedition sent to the Bahamas by the Baltimore Geographical 
Society. During the remainder of the summer he was engaged in work on 
annelids for the U. S. Fish Commission, at their laboratory at Beaufort. 

Messrs. E. K. Graham, Archibald Henderson and J. E. Latta have re- 
turned to the University after a year's leave of absence. Mr Graham 
held a scholarship in English and took his M.A. degree at Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York. Dr. Henderson held a fellowship and instructorship 
in Mathematics at the University of Chicago. Mr. Latta held a fellow- 
ship in Physics at Harvard University. Mr. Graham spent his summer 



THE UNIVKKSITY REOOBD 17 

working in Ooltimbia University Library. Mr Latta spent the rammer 
in Massachusetts, attended the convention of the National Educational 
Association in Boston, and took a course of reading in the librarian of 
Harvard University. 

Messrs. W. S. Bernard and L. R. Wilson spent the greater portion of the 
summer recataloguing the works on Biography in the University Library. 
About twenty-live hundred volumes were recatalogued, and a new scheme 
was devised for getting at the North Carolina publications. Electric 
lights have been put in, and the Library is now kept open from 7:30 to 9:00 
at night. 

During a portion of the summer Prof. Baskerville was engaged with 
Dr. Geo. F. Kunz, of Tiffany & Co., in an extended investigation of certain 
optical properties of the precious stones in the Morgan- Tiffany gem col- 
lection in the American Museum of Natural History, New York. Aside 
from their conduct with the Roentgen rays and ultra-violet light, the gems 
were examined when subjected to the action of the emanations of radium 
of high activity especially imported from the Society Centralle des Pro- 
duits Chimique at Paris. The finer radium preparations were provided 
through the generosity of Mr. Edward H. Adams of New York. During 
the investigation a new gem material was examined and found to respond 
brilliantly to radium. This Dr. Baskerville named after his co-worker, 
Kunzite, and it is one of the most exquisite gems. The collection studied 
was made by Tiffany & Co., exhibited at the World's Fair at Paris and 
purchased and presented to the Museum by Mr. Pierpont Morgan, who 
received as an evidence of appreciation the title of an Officer of the Legion 
of Honor. Another investigation was carried on at the same time with 
the Morgan- Bement collection of minerals, noting their conduct under the 
action of ultra-violet light. Some 13,000 individual minerals were exam- 
ined and many new and interesting facts developed. The work done on 
the gems will be published in special book form illustrated, and that on the 
minerals will be issued in a special bulletin of the American Museum of 
Natural History. 



' 



18 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

NOTES. 

At the meeting of the Southern Educational Association, held at Ashe- 
ville in June, Dr. Venable was elected President for the coming year. The 
next meeting of the Association will be held in Atlanta, December 30- Jan- 
uary 1. 

Professor J. A. Holmes represented the University at the recent meeting 
of Mining Schools held at Dead wood, South Dakota, and was appointed one 
of the directors. 

Dr. J. E. Mills, Instructor in Physical Chemistry, has resigned, to become 
chemist to the Standard Turpentine Company. He is manager of its works 
in South Carolina. Dr. R. O. E. Davis succeeds him here, and Mr. W. M. 
Marriott takes Dr. Davis' former place. Messrs. W. A. Whitaker, W. H. 
Oldham and L. B. Lockhart have been appointed assistants in the chem- 
ical department. 

The assistants in other departments for this year are: Mr. G. R. Berke- 
ley, Biology; Mr. W. J. Gordon, French; Messrs. W. W. Eagles and G. S. 
MacNider, Geology; Mr. W. C. Rankin, German; Mr. F. H. Gregory, 
Physics; Mr. J. B. Cranmer, Anatomy; Mr. L. B. Newell, Anatomy and 
Pathology; Mr. J. B. LeGwin, Pharmacy. 

That the work done by students in the University is appreciated in other 
States is shown by the following list of recent graduates, who have been 
chosen to important positions: Reston Stevenson, assistant in chemistry, 
Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.; R. A. Lichtenthaeler, instructor in 
chemistry, University of Florida; H. H. Bennett, assistant chemist, Unit- 
ed States Soil Survey, Washington; Hazel Holland, assistant chemist, 
Welsbach Light Company, Gloucester City, N. J.; Thomas B. Foust, chief 
chemist of the Bon Air Coal and Iron Company, Nashville; H. R. Weller, 
chemist for Garrett Wine Company, St. Louis; J. B. Thorpe, assistant chem- 
ist for Clairton, Pa., Steel Works; Warren Kluttz, assistant chemist, Ten- 
nessee Coal and Iron Company, Bessemer City, Ala.; W. S. Prior, assist- 
ant chemist, Tennessee Coal and Iron Company, Ensley, Ala ; D. Z. Cau- 
ble, assistant chemist, Tennessee Coal and Iron Company, Bessemer, Ala. ; 
Z. V. Judd, instructor in French, University of Florida; D. M. Swink, 
manager of the Electric Light and $fc>wer Company, Newark, N. J. 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD JU 

TheohemioaJ departmeni has received gifts from fche following: 

From Messrs. Tiffany & Oo ., New York, a collection of tanned Leathers 
from a number of different animals. Also, a sample of fche new gem, 
Kunzite. 

From the Oassell Color Company, New York, a number of books and 
samples illustrating the dyeing of cotton, silk and wool. 

From the Dorenms Camphor Company, a sample of artificial camphor 
made from turpentine. 

Mr. Alfred D. Browne, who has begun his work as Instructor in Physi- 
cal Culture, is a graduate of the International Training School, at Spring- 
field, Mass. During several summers he had charge of athletic work for 
the Boston School Board and for the Civic League. At Mount Airy, Pa. , 
he served as Pysical Director in the Pennsylvania Institution. Recently 
he has been Physical Director of the Y. M. C. A. Gymnasium at German- 
town, Pa., one of the largest in the country. 

It has been decided to begin work at once on the new building of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. Contributions received during the 
vacation bring the building fund to something over $7000. The building 
will cost $10,000. The money on hand will be expended, and there is no 
doubt that enough will be raised by that time to enable the committee to 
complete the building. It will probably be placed a little South of the 
open space between Gerrard Hall and the South Building. 

The University of Pennsylvania conferred the degree of Doctor of Laws 
upon President Venable at its commencement, June 17th. In presenting 
him, the public orator said: -'We have invited to be present to-day Francis 
Preston Venable, who is distributing, with beneficent hand, the wealth of 
talent bestowed upon him by God and enriched by his own industry. He 
has studied the composition of matter in the famous schools of two 
continents, mastered the stable and volatile elements of the material world, 
and crystallized into written form the results of his experiments and obser- 
vations. These permanent contributions to the literature of chemistry 
identify his name with academic education and the supreme art of teach- 
ing. Chosen, in 1900, President of the University of North Carolina, he 
ascended from definition and studies in chemistry to the loftier considera- 
tion of the mental and moral phenoi Ana revealed iu the youth confided 
to his guidance and authority. He l^^brought to the performance of his 




1 



20 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

delicate and responsible duties the inspiring qualities of the heroic Arnold, 
the precepts and culture of Horace Mann. He recognizes that men, to be 
great, must grow contemporaneously in character and knowledge. He 
is fortunate in an environment that is aglow with splendid and historic 
memories. From the Revolution the South has been the encouraging 
patron of literature. Eloquence, poetry and romance, have nourished in 
its genial and chilvalric atmosphere. It has inherited the blood of the 
Cavalier, the Huguenot and the Scotchman. The children of these three 
virile races will, happily, in the future be enlightened by his instruction 
and ennobled by his example. Therefore do we, the Trustees, present him 
to the Provost that he may receive die degree of Doctor of Laws." 

These changes in the faculty of the Medical Department at Raleigh have 
been announced: Dr. H. McK. Tucker has been appointed Professor of 
Obstetrics; Dr. A. W. Goodwin, Professor of Skin, Genito-urinary and 
Venereal Diseases; Dr. James McKee, Clinical Professor of Nervous and 
Mental Diseases; Dr. Joseph graham, Instructor in Diseases of Children 
and Physical Diagnosis; Dr. J. W. McGee, Jr., Lecturer on Therapeutics; 
Dr. R. S. McGeachy, in charge of the free dispensary by virtue of his 
position as city physician. These changes materially strengthen the teach- 
ing force. It is no longer necessary for the student of medicine to leave 
the State in order to get the best medical training. This department of 
the University has had a most successful opening. 

No better work has been done for education in North Carolina than that 
of the Summer School, held here June 15 to July 10. Forty-four courses 
were given, including a wide range of subjects from the common school to 
the college. The instructors were teachers of large experience, each one 
a specialist in his subject. About two hundred students were in attend- 
ance during the session, a larger number than usual The increased 
enrollment was especially gratifying in view of the fact that summer 
schools have recently sprung up like mushrooms over the State. 

At a largely attended meeting of University Alumni at Greensboro last 
night, Henry W. Wharton, acting as president, and T. Gilbert Pearson, 
secretary, a permanent organization was effected and a constitution and 
by-laws submitted by Mr. A. M. Scajas, of a committee appointed for that 
purpose. The following officers ^|l lj e elected: Dr. Charles D. Mclver, 
president; Mr. Jas. W. Forbis, -*fP v president; Mr. Victor C. McAdoo, 



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 21 

secretary and treasurer. Executive committee: Dr. W. T. Whitsott, Dr. 
T. R. Little, Messrs. A. M. Scales, Eugene Armfield, J. I. Foust, Henry 
W. Wharton, T. A. Sharpe, J. A. Gilmer, and W. P. Mangum Turner. 
At the meeting last nighl the part to betaken by the association in the 
reunion was discussed. It was decided to use Mr. Clem G. Wright's law 
office as University headquarters during the reunion. Messrs. V. O. Mc- 
Adoo, C G. Wright, Michael Schenck, G. S Ferguson and P. D. Gold, 
Jr. , were appointed as a committee to make arrangements for entertain- 
ment to be given to the visiting alumni during the reunion. Invitations 
will be issued to President F. P. Venable, and ex-Presidents Dr. Kemp P. 
Battle, Dr. George T. Winston and Dr. E. A Alderman, to be the guests 
of the Alumni Association while attending. — Charlotte Observer. 



AMONG THE ALUMNI. 



'67. — Hon. Patrick Henry Winston is editor of Winston's Weekly, pub- 
lished at Spokane, Washington. 

'68. — Fabius H. Busbee is a member of the committee to arrange for the 
Universal Congress of Lawyers and Jurists, to be held at St. Louis in Sep- 
tember, 1904. 

'78. — Dr. R. L. Payne is President of the Association of Southern Rail- 
way Surgeons. 

'81. — Hon. Charles R. Thomas, Member of Congress from the Third 
District, addressed the law class September 24th on the "Opportunities of 
the Profession." 

Superintendent J. Y. Joyner has been elected Secretary of the Associa- 
tion of Southern School Commissioners. 

'91. — Dr. J. Martin Fleming is President of the North Carolina Dental 
Society. 

'90. — Dr. John H. London has Jj^en appointed dentist to the Soldiers' 
Home in Washington . 

'92.— Walter Murphy is Grand IjSAed Ruler of Elks for North Oaro- 




22 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

lina; and C. F. Tomlinson, '95, Grand Esteemed Lecturing Knight of the 
Grand Lodge of Elks. 

'93. — J. Crawford Biggs is the member for North Carolina of the Gen- 
eral Council of the American Bar Association. 

'94. — Rev. Howard E. Rondthaler is in charge of the Theological Semi- 
nary of the Moravian Church, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Benjamin Wyche, for some years Librarian of the University of Texas, 
has been appointed Librarian of the Carnegie Library at San Antonio. 

'96. — Dr. Walter V. Brem is practicing medicine at Crawford, Miss. 
His examination before the State board was the best. 

'97. — Darius Eatman has been elected Professor of Pedagogy in Wake 
Forest College. 

John H. Andrews has been promoted to the position of Travelling 
Freight Agent of the Southern Railway. 

J. Solon Williams has been appointed Instructor in English, and Harllee 
MacCall, ex- '96, Instructor in Mathematics, at the North Carolina Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College. 

'98. — Richard S. Busbee has resigned his office in the Southern Tariff 
Association at Charlotte to accept a position in an insurance company in 
Atlanta. 

1902. — Miss Imogen Stone has been elected to a position in the English 
department of the Sophie Newcomb College at New Orleans. 

Misses Stone, Susan W. Moses and Mabel Hale, all of whom have been 
students here, were among the fourteen students elected to membership 
in Phi Beta Kappa at Cornell last year. 

The wide extent of the University's usefulness to the State was illus- 
trated at the meeting of the Farmers' Convention and Good Roads Con- 
ference held at Raleigh in July. Among the alumni who took an active 
part in the proceedings were: Governor Aycock, '79, ex- Senator Matt. W. 
Ransom, '47, George T. Winston, '68, J. Y. Joyner, '81, R. W. Scott, '78, 
W. C. Riddick, '85, W. L. Spoon, '91, and R. H. Sykes, '97. The Com- 
missioner of Agriculture, S. L. Patterson, '68, was prevented by illness 
from attending. Senator R. W. Scolds President of the Association. 

M 



THE univkksity RECORD 

MARRIAGES OF ALUMNI. 

At Hayes, Maryland, June 10, 1903, Dr. Richard A. Urquhart and Miss 
Helen Dunlop. 

At Lincolnton, N. 0., June 23, 1903, Dr. Archibald Henderson, 1898, 
and Miss Minna Curtis Bynum, 1902. 

At Franklin, N. 0., June 25, 1903, Mr. George H. Orowell and Miss 
Elizabeth Louise Gaston. 

At Spartanburg, S. C, July, 1903, Mr. John Wilson Alexander and Miss 
Nora Harrison Watkins. 

At Chapel Hill, July 1903, Mr. D. Z. Cauble and Miss Jessie Cheek. 

At Troutman, N. C, September 16, 1903, Mr. E. W. Brawley and Miss 
Kate Elizabeth Patterson. 



NECROLOGY. 



Allen, David Charles. Matriculated from Brunswick county. 1855-57. 
General Assembly. Lawyer. Planter. Colonel C. S. A. Died 
at Armour, Columbus county, April 2, 1903. 

Dupre, Ovide. Matriculated from St. Martin's Parish, La. A.B., 1862. 
Teacher. Lawyer in New York City. U. S. Assistant District 
Attorney. Born 1844, died July 13, 1903. 

Jones, Rufus Henry, Wake county. A.B., 1843. Farmer near Cary. 
Died August, 1903. 

Lamb, Samuel Selden, Elizabeth City. Matriculated, 1896. Bachelor of 
Laws, 1898. Lawyer and Journalist. Died September 29, 1903. 

Long, John S., New Berne. Law Student, 1851-52. A.B., Randolph- 
Macon, 1851. Lawyer. Methodist Minister. LL.D., 1890. Died 
at Baltimore, July, 1903. 

McDade, Wayne H., Chapel ttjfa -54. Soldier C. S. A. 

Farmer. Died July, 1901 




V 

24 THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

Mickle, Joseph Caldwell, Chapel Hill. Student, 1862-64 Soldier C. 
S. A, Methodist Minister. Presiding Elder. Teacher, Bryan, 
Texas. Born 1844, died July 8, 1903. 

Pool, John Hersey, Pasquotank county. Student, 1854-57. Physician, 
South Mills. Died July 29, 1903. 

Taylor, James Fauntleroy, Raleigh. A.B., 1841; A.M., 1844. State 
Librarian. Trustee U. N. C, 1870-74. Born September 21, 1821, 
died August 31, 1903. 

Towles, Daniel Thomas, Raleigh. A.B., 1849; A.M., 1852. Presby- 
terian Minister, Clarkton, N. C. Born November 27, 1822, died 
1902. 






q 



VI 



3 0112 105882432 



(Announcements 



THE Spring Term of the University 
of North Carolina will beg-in Jan- 
uary 2, 1904. 

Registration, January 2, 4, 5. Ap- 
plicants for admission into the Univer- 
sity will be examined on the days 
appointed for registration. 

Lectures in the Academic Depart- 
ment and in the Professional Schools 
will begin January 5, 1904. Com- 
mencement will be on June 1, 1904. 

For the Catalogue or for detailed 
information, address 

F. P. VENABUE, President 

University of North Carolina 
Chapel Hill